A Mummy Ate My Homework! by Thiago de Moraes

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Published by Scholastic, 2020.

A Mummy Ate My Homework! is an extremely funny book. It’s a time travel adventure story which sees 11-year-old Henry transported from his maths lesson back in time to Ancient Egypt. He gets into all sorts of scrapes, from getting chased by an angry mob and disturbing a mummy to finding a crocodile in his bed.

The book’s packed full of really cool facts about life in Ancient Egypt, apparently eating raw onions for breakfast was a thing, and people actually kept crocodiles and baboons as pets! Henry finds that certain aspects of Egyptian life take a lot of getting used to – riding by chariot or camel, for instance, and he’s not thrilled by the lack of underpants either. However, he does make some great new friends and has fun learning astronomy, making masks of Egyptian gods, and defacing statues of the pharaoh by painting moustaches on them.

Although a super swot at school back home, Henry has less success with his lessons in Ancient Egypt. He barely manages to come out of his arts of war and hunting lessons alive, and spends most of his chariot driving lessons clinging on for dear life!

The cartoon-style illustrations are really entertaining and add another layer of fun.

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The book’s in a really enjoyable format – a mixture of illustrated text, comic strips, funny lists, diagrams and a map. There’s also the chance to practise writing in hieroglyphics and solve a puzzle.

While there’s obviously lots to laugh about, the book also gives us some more serious issues to think about. Woven into the storyline are observations about inequality: slavery and lack of access to education for girls, for example.

I really enjoyed A Mummy Ate My Homework! and look forward to seeing what happens next in the series.

Rating: 💙💙💙💙💙

Suitable for children aged 6+

Thank you to Scholastic for sending me this book to review. I reviewed it as part of the A Mummy Ate My Homework! blog tour where I shared an extract from the book. Click here to read it.

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